Tag Archives: Fruits

NEW FOOD FRIDAY FLASH – BOBOTIE

15 Jan

I was tossing out old magazines and I stopped short when I saw this recipe in a magazine called Journey. I don’t often see a recipe that comes from South Africa but when I saw this one for Bobotie, I knew I had to post it in my blog. I’m not sure of the pronunciation because I’ve seen it pronounced several ways on the Internet, but I’m going with “Bobootie.”  South Africans enjoy spicy Eastern flavors, including Indian curries and Malayan spices, Dutch and English foods, and traditional African dishes. This Bobotie is one of South Africa’s most-loved dishes. It’s a combination of sweet and savory served casserole style. Note that there are no vegetables in this recipe, only fruits! Maybe your children will like it! In any case, it’s my choice for this month’s New Food Friday Flash.

 

Ingredients

2 large onions

2 Tablespoons butter

1 thick slice white bread

1 cup milk

2 lbs ground lamb or beef

2 ½ Tablespoons strong curry powder

1 teaspoon turmeric

2 tablespoons apricot jam

¼ cup sliced almonds

¼ cup lemon juice (or vinegar)

2 teaspoons salt

½ teaspoon white pepper

¼ cup seedless raisins

1 green apple, grated (or substitute carrots)

10 dried apricots, soaked & diced (or ¼ cup raisins)

4 dried bay or lemon leaves

2 eggs

 

Directions

Pre-heat the oven to 350F. lightly fry the onions in the butter. Soak the bread in half the milk and mash with a fork.

 

Mix the meat with all of the ingredients except for the eggs, the rest of the milk and the bay or lemon leaves.

 

Put the mixture in an oven proof dish. Push the bay leaves into the top of the mixture. Cover and bak for about 45-60 minutes, depending on size of dish.

 

Beat the eggs and remaining milk together and pour over the meat. Slightly lift it to allow the egg to run into the bobotie.

 

Bake until brown on top (about 15 – 20 minutes.

 

Garnish with additional bay leaves.  Serves 8 – 10.

 

This recipe is a great way to get more fruit into your diet. Traditionally this is served with yellow rice made with rice, turmeric, raisins, almonds, and cloves. A tasty, different meal that is very good for your health!

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An Additional 10 Fruits You Never Heard Of – New Food Friday Flash

18 Jul

This was supposed to publish automatically on the 18th since I set it for that but for some reason, it didn’t.  Anyway, the middle of the month comes around so fast! Where does the time go?

Recently, on last month’s New Food Friday Flash, I wrote a post and a Yahoo article about 10 fruits you’ve never tried or even heard of. Since that peaked several readers interest, I decided to do another post about 10 additional fruits that you’ve most likely never heard of.

NOTE: At the time of this writing, Yahoo articles will not be accepting freelance writing anymore. So, until I find another website that I enjoy submitting articles to, I will be posting the more in-depth information here on my blog instead of including a link to a separate article.

Sometimes we are all so caught up in our own little world that we don’t stop to think what other fruits might be available in other countries. Since we are such a mobile society, we have the opportunity to try these fruits when we travel for business or pleasure. But first, it helps to know that they exist! When I listed these fruits, I began to think that their names reminded me of other names. For your amusement, I also included some of the names they reminded me of in parentheses.

 

Pitanga

The Pitanga fruit grows wild in Latin America and can range in colors from scarlet to near black. This is a very fragile fruit that is very sweet and barely larger than a cherry. It is also known as a Surinam cherry, a Brazilian cherry, a Cayenne cherry, and a Florida cherry. Its grown in gardens and orchards only across the world because of its delicate skin. You can find it in juices, ice creams, jams, and chutneys.

 

Illawarra Plum

This plum belongs to an ancient species and is a southern hemisphere conifer found along Australia’s east coast. The tree itself is a prolific producer. Most supplies of this fruit come from wild harvest and are used in sweet and savory dishes. They are most often enjoyed in preserves, fruit compotes, baking and sauces.

 

Cashew Apple

We’re all familiar with the cashew nut but are you familiar with the apple that is attached to the nut? It is one of Brazil’s fruits found along the coast of the northeast region. Cashew apples range in color from pale yellow to vermilion. Ancient tribes used it to make a wine called mocororo. Today it is one of Brazil’s most popular fruit juices. It is also used as a base in a juice called cajuina. You can find it in ice creams,  mousses, trifles, jams, and chutneys. When set on low heat for several hours, it produces a syrup known as cashew honey.

Cashew Apple

Cashew Apple

 

Lucuma

The lucuma is found mostly in Peru but also in Chile, Brazil, and Ecuador. It’s not likely that you will find it fresh in any other countries. It is an indigenous crop once known to the Incas. It resembles a small mango, first green, then turning red. The flesh is gold colored and fragrant. One tree can produce up to 500 fruits in one year. It can be eaten out of hand, and used as a drink. It’s powdered form is used in ice creams and sweets. Lucuma is rich in iron and niacin and an excellent source of beta-carotene. Gluten-intolerant folks can use it in place of wheat and it can also be used as a low-glycemic sweetener.

 

Red Mombin  (Reminds me of a snake. There’s a black momba snake, I’m not sure there’s a red momba)

The Red Mombin has many names: jocote, ciruela, Spanish plum, and siniguelas. It is grown in Mexico, the Philippines, Brazil, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua. The tree is easy to propagate and is fast growing and therefore it may transition from being a wild fruit to a cultivated fruit. It has a sweet flavor and a citric fragrance and comes in many colors. It can be eaten raw or produced into a refreshing juice, a base for ice creams, a preserve, and eaten green before ripening seasoned with salt. The fruit is small, only 1 – 2 inches with a delicate skin.

 

Ambarella (Reminds me of the movie, Barbarella with Jane Fonda)

As you have seen, many of these fruits are known by many different names. The Ambarella is one of them. Other monikers are: golden apple, pomme cythere, Otaheite apple, Tahitian quince, hog plum, Brazil plum, Polynesian plum, and Jew plum. I wouldn’t want to get into an argument over its name! It was originally native to the society Islands of the South Pacific but now grown in tropical and subtropical areas such as Southeast Asia, India, Sri Lanka, Australia, Jamaica, Trinidad and Venezuela. Many people enjoy the fruit when unripe for its tangy sourness and crisp texture. It is often mixed with other fruit juices for a cold drink. It can be stewed to make a sauce accompanying meat or made into preserves, pickles, chutneys, jams and relishes. It is a popular street snack served sliced and dipped in salt and cayenne.

  

Wampee (Reminds me of Native American Indian words: cross between wampum and teepee)

The Wampee tree is native to southern China but also grows in greenhouses in England. You can find the fruits in Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Thailand. It is a distant cousin to the orange. Each fruit has five segments of soft jellylike flesh varying from sweet and tangy to sharp and almost sour. They are thirst quenching and refreshing. In Vietnam and China, the halved, sun-dried, immature fruit is used as a cough remedy. It can be eaten as a preserve, a jam, and made into pies, and drinks, including an aperitif. Wampee can be eaten fresh when fully ripe. The Chinese prize the fruit as a digestive aid.

 

Mirabelle (Reminds me of Clarabelle, Buffalo Bob’s cow. Wow, how old was I, 5 ? Anybody remember Buffalo Bob?)

There are two varieties of Mirabelle, which is a honey-sweet plum grown in orchards: the smaller is the Mirabelle de Nancy and the other, the Mirabelle de Metz. They have been most closely identified with the region of Lorraine, France. Travelers in France or persons of French extraction may be familiar with the dessert tarte aux mirabelles. Mirabelle can also be made into jams, jellies, and preserves. If you have the opportunity to taste the tarte, don’t pass it up or you will regret it!

 

Salak (Reminds me of words I’ve heard regarding Iraq)

Native to Indonesia although also grown in Thailand and Malaysia, Salak is known as snakeskin fruit because it has a leathery scaly skin. The best Salak are grown in Bali. The taste is a cross between a pineapple and a Granny Smith apple. Once you peel away the reddish brown skin, the three white segments  resemble peeled cloves of garlic but on a larger scale. Salak can be eaten fresh, but are also pickled or canned in syrup. They can be cooked in desserts and are often added to pies and puddings.

 

Duku (Reminds me of a city in western Asia?)

The flesh of the Duku can be either white or pink. These fruits are round like golf balls, their outer shell is a bland tan color. However, their segments are juicy and sweet. This is another fruit with many names and is found across Southeast Asia. Another variety of this fruit is called langsat but it is smaller and egg-shaped with a thinner skin. It is also more tart than duki. In Thailand it is known as longkong. In the Philippines it is called lanzones where they might preserve the fruit in syrup. Filipinos dry the skins which when burned produce a smoke that repels mosquitoes. Anything that repels mosquitoes is A-OK in my book.

 

Do these names remind you of other names?

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10 Fruits You Never Heard Of – New Food Friday Flash

20 Jun Fill Your Cart With Fresh Fruits

We take for granted all the varieties of apples, pears, plums, oranges, and other fruits, that we find in our supermarkets everyday. Many of these fruits are shipped from across the nation and beyond so that they can be on our table, fresh, sweet, and ready to eat. But have you ever thought about what fruits are served at kitchen tables in France, Germany, Russia, Australia, Central America, India, or Africa?

 

The 10 fruits I’m covering today in this New Food Friday Flash are fresh fruits that turn up on kitchen tables more commonly in other countries. If you do find any of them at your local grocery store, let me know! But how can you try these fruits? Well, you could ask your grocer if he could order them for you or you could plan a trip to the country they come from, vacation there, and as part of your adventure, try the new fruit!

 

Here is the list of 10 fruits below. Do you recognize any of them?

 

Casseille

 

Sea Buckthorn

 

Riberry

 

Marula

 

Mazhanje

 

Mamoncillo

Mamoncillo Fruit

Mamoncillo

 

Griotte

 

Acerola

 

Davidson’s Plum

 

Jamun

 

For more information about them, the ways they are used, and which country each is from, read the article I’ve written here.

 

The next New Food Friday Flash will contain 10 more fruits you’ve never eaten and a link to more in-depth information about them.

 

Fruit is good for your health and travel is good for your mind!

 

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