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Happy Election Day/Happy Birthday/Happy 100 Followers

6 Nov Happy Birthday!

Today is election day. It is also my birthday. It is also the day I now have 100 followers on my blog.

HURRAY!

Hope you had a great day. I celebrated by o.d.’ ing on chocolate:

Lindt milk chocolate with hazelnuts

S’mores (my first s’more ever)

Keebler Deluxe Fudge Covered Graham Crackers

Chocolate Eclairs with Custard filling

This is what a dedicated health nut eats on her birthday. How old am I? I’m 30 again! I proclaim that it’s OK to go a little crazy on your birthday! (I did work out today.)

YAYAAAAA!

I also ordered a new part for my broken lawnmower. If it is the correct part and my lawnmower starts working again, I will write a post about it.

This is my idea of a happy birthday. To each his own. The icing on the cake would be if Obama won the election! I predict that he will!

YAYAAAAA!

To all my followers, have a great day and a great evening!

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The Rebuilding of Ground Zero

27 Sep By Succu (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (httpcreativecommons.orglicensesby-sa3.0)], Wikimedia Commons

I was watching TV in bed a few weeks ago and was about to turn in when PBS announced a Nova special: Engineering Ground Zero. The program was so interesting that I stayed up to watch it.

 

This program isn’t so much about what happened 9/11, 2001, it is about the rebuilding of this 16-acre site.

THAT WAS THEN…

The film is inspiring, hopeful, with leaders who are full of innovative ideas that will amaze you!

 

Yes, when they first began talking about rebuilding a skyscraper, I admit, I thought they had lost their minds! But after seeing this film, I feel very reassured and that is why I wanted to write this post, to share with you what I learned from this program.

 

There were many bitter disagreements, starts and stops in this rebuilding process, but when momentum took hold, Michael Arad was chosen as the architect and designer of the 9/11 Memorial. It was a design that was chosen out of 5,000 entries.

 

In no particular order, the film mainly covers:

The 9/11 Memorial (the cascading pools)

The MemorialPlaza (includes the 400 trees)

One WorldTradeCenter (the skyscraper)

The underground massive museum

The steel

The concrete

The glass panels

The bronze panels

 

The 9/11 Memorial

The Memorial is a phenomenal structure of two flowing water pools where the twin towers had been. I get goose bumps when I think about it because water has so much significance when you think about it. To me it signifies cleansing, purity, sustenance, life, and healing properties. Each of these pools is 30,000 square feet, almost an acre of void. The design calls for 52,000 gallons of water to cascade over the walls every minute, drop 30 feet, and disappear into a second, inner pool. What Arad created was brilliant, genius!

 

The Bronze Panels

Names of the 2,982 individuals whose lives were lost are not listed alphabetically, but by the locations where individuals died: the South Tower, the North Tower, Flights 11, 93, 77, 175 and the Pentagon. First responders and those who died in the 1993 attacks are also grouped together. One-hundred-fifty-two bronze panels will surround the pools with these names.

For fifty percent of the people that are on the Memorial, no remains were found, so this is going to be, for many families and many loved ones, the place that they will go on those special days: the birthdays, anniversaries. Unfortunately, this is the final resting place of the deceased.

They wanted the memorial part of the site to be completed on the 10-year anniversary of the attack, September 11, 2011. They accomplished that goal and you get to see this beautiful memorial from start to finish in the film. When fully completed, the entire site will include a train station to rival Grand Central, six new towers, and, at its heart, the 9/11 Memorial.

 

The Skyscraper

One World Trade Center skyscraper begins with world-renowned architect David Childs who is striving for a balance of security with beauty. The first 20 stories are like a bunker, built to withstand the force of a truck bomb. As it rises, the tower transforms into eight interlocking triangles, covered in huge panels of clear glass. More than a hundred stories up, a broadcast antenna brings the total height to a symbolic 1776 feet. The cost? More than three billion dollars, Childs’ design will be one of the most expensive skyscrapers ever built and one of the most innovative.


The Concrete

The core of One World Trade Center contains critical safety systems like extra-wide stairwells. It’s made of a material that’s strong like steel, but more fire-resistant: concrete.

 

The cores in the Twin Towers were compromised on 9/11, because they were made of steel wrapped in thin sheetrock. Childs’ design calls for super-strong concrete. So strong that it had to be developed in the lab. In testing this new concrete, they formed a four-inch-diameter cylinder of the concrete. It can accommodate a thousand Americans standing on this one cylinder. Challenges are getting the concrete to the site before it hardens, not to mention pumping it up 40 stories high.

 

When finished, One World Trade Center will contain almost 500,000 tons of this material, much of it in its core, which has walls up to six feet thick. Inside, the core protects a total of 70 elevators, as well as the extra-wide stairwells that are pressurized to keep smoke out. Smoke is the real killer.

Childs has a vision of using prismatic glass at the podium to add to the beauty of the structure. Cutting grooves into glass this thick and this large has never been done before. The only way to do it is to build a new machine from scratch.

The Glass Panels

Each glass panel consists of laminated safety glass on the inside, an insulating air space, and another thick pane of glass on the outside, lined with an energy-saving coating. The coating lets sunshine in while reducing heat, resulting in cost savings in office lighting and air-conditioning.

Installing these panels is a painstaking task: they can weigh up to 5,000 pounds. There are around 13,000 panels. When this wall of glass is complete, it will wrap around the entire building from the 20th floor to the top. I don’t know about you, but that blows my mind!

The Podium

The podium of One World Trade Center is a square about the size of the original towers. But as it rises above its base, at the 20th floor, the corners taper in. A square becomes an octagon. Four sides become eight interlocking triangles. Finally, at the top, it resolves in a square once again. Above the podium, One World Trade Center is going up a floor a week.

 

The “Green” Building

One World Trade Center is designed to be a certified green building. Steel contributes to that, because much of it comes from recycled materials like old refrigerators, cars, even toasters, all melted down into liquid.

 

Some of the largest steel pieces are called nodes. They can be as large as 60 tons and stand three stories high. Nodes are giant joints that hold multiple pieces of steel together. They come in all shapes and sizes and make it possible for the building to shift form, from four sides into eight. And they also help re-distribute the weight as the building rises.

THIS IS NOW…

 

Working with steel this big takes experience. Peter Jacobs is a member of the Mohawk Nation, famed for their work on skyscrapers and bridges for over a century. For more information about the Mohawk Nation, click here.

 

The Museum

A massive underground museum is being built beneath the Memorial plaza. People are going to be looking up at the underside of the plaza above, which is 60-70 feet above. There will be a very large volume of space. People will understand the enormity, and the scale of what was lost.

 

The Trees

Four hundred trees are being prepared to be taken to their new home: Ground Zero. They originally come from the three places where people died: New York, Pennsylvania and the Washington, D.C. area. These trees have their own computer chip in them. They have their own monitoring system for aeration and irrigation. Some weigh 18,000 pounds each.

 

The Conclusion?

The rebuilding of Ground Zero won’t be finished for years. David Childs’ original concept to cover the concrete podium with prismatic glass has been scrapped. Its replacement is yet undecided in this film. Many of this skyscraper’s safety features are likely to make it one of the most influential buildings in America.

 

By the way, you can watch the program online for free at: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/engineering-ground-zero.html Just click on the green bar on the upper right. A DVD is also available for purchase.

Some films help us to move on from an uncomfortable place. This is one of those films.

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Commemorating 9/11

11 Sep 017_17

 

I was listening to the TV eating my lunch when the news anchor announced that there would be a “Healing Field” held at the Crown Cemetery in Fishers, Indiana. It would be hosted by the National Exchange Club. They wanted volunteers. This sounded like something I would be interested in so I took down the phone number and called.

The Reading of the Names

To my surprise, I was the only non-Exchange Club member to call and volunteer. They asked me if I would like to participate in reading some of the names of the people we lost on 9/11. I was touched that they asked me.

Still a New Yorker

I left Queens, New York when I was 29 but decades later, I’m still a New Yorker at heart. I wasn’t in New York when the attack occurred, but I felt the loss as if I was still there. I watched it live on a big screen TV at work. We all did. I might as well have been there. So I needed a tangible expression of mourning and although this particular Healing Field took place in 2004, I didn’t feel that I had progressed much since September 11, 2001.

Healing Fields

Participating in the Healing Fields did much to heal me. It involved many boy scouts hammering re-bars into the ground to hold up the American flags and situate the flags. Volunteers also helped carry and position a flag. I participated with this too. Each flag represented a person who died that day. I still get chills just typing this. The photos of that day can express what occurred better than I ever could.

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Official Ceremony With US Fighter Jets

There was an official ceremony and at the close, US Fighter Jets flew overhead. As fast as they were, I still can’t believe that I got two photos of them flying overhead. It was incredibly spectacular!

I’ll Never Forget

The Healing Fields was a day I’ll never forget nor will I ever forget 9/11. Sometimes we need help in recovering from a traumatic event. An event like the Healing Fields goes a long way to restore your good health.

For more information about the Healing Fields, click: Healing Fields

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Very Inspiring Blog Award

22 Jul Very Inspiring Blogger Award

I was delighted and surprised to receive a nomination for a Very Inspiring Blog Award from P.C. Zick. I enjoy reading her blog as we have similar interests.

Here are the requirements for this award:

1)      Display the award logo on your blog.

2)      Link back to the person who nominated you.

3)      State 7 things about yourself.

4)      Nominate 15 other bloggers for this award and link to them.

5)      Notify those bloggers of the nomination and the award’s requirements.

Seven things about myself

1. I used to take flying lessons. I have 27 1/2 flight hours logged in a Cessna.

2. I have a strong belief in the healing powers of exercise.

3. The more butter I slather on bread, the better it tastes.

4. I was in the color guard in junior high school.

5. Housework is for the birds.

6. I like to sing.

7. I’m a good listener.

My nominations for the Very Inspiring Blog Award –This is going to be a challenge because I’m still new here but I have come across some very worthy blogs. I like some of them for their writing style or their photographs. I like some because their interests are very different from mine and I want to learn more from them. I like some because we have a lot in common and I can relate, and I like some because I admire their creativity. There is one who is an employer and writes an employee blog. It’s very notable. He may not accept my nomination but you win some, you lose some. Nothing ventured, nothing gained I always say.

1. claudiagiulia

2. clotildajamcracker

3. seamistandmagnolias

4. thesugarlump

5. musingsoncountryliving

6. tbnranch

7. silverbells2012

8.  gardensandgarlic

9. floraseasons

10. blog.palletone

11. soulsbyfar

12. salmonfishingqueen

13. thefishermanswife

14. thehourofsoftlight

15. gardenpath

So many blogs, so little time!

If you see your blog here, don’t wait for me to contact you. You can get started displaying the award logo on your blog and following the directions posted in this post. Just leave me a comment so I know that you’ve already started so I don’t have to contact you and we end up doing double duty. Enjoy your award!

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What You Eat Today, Walks and Talks Tomorrow

27 Jun hazelnuts - sxc.hu/ hirvike

I come from an Italian-American family. My parents were born here; so was I and my two sisters. My mother’s parents came from Bari, Italy which is a city in the southern part of Italy or the heel of the boot. My father’s parents came from Arzignano, Italy which is a city in between Verona and Venice, Italy.

Consequently, I learned to cook a variety of Italian dishes. When I married and left home, I began to experiment with other cuisines. I always liked cooking, baking too. I’m addicted to cooking shows and cookbooks and cooking and baking DVDs! I never get tired of the stuff! My ears perk up when I hear about a new recipe or something I’ve never tried.

One winter I decided to make all my own bread. I didn’t buy a single loaf of bread at the supermarket. Rye bread, whole wheat bread, French bread, oatmeal bread, it was all so good slathered in butter.

I’ve made all kinds of rolls, pizzas, pies, cakes, soft pretzels, jelly rolls, butter cookies, ginger snaps, spice puffs, I mean really, who can remember it all? There isn’t much I haven’t tried. But for the most part, I’m not a sweets eater. I made cookies for when my son was little. Now that he’s an adult, I don’t make them anymore. Besides, he’s more of a health nut than I am. Not that he would turn down my cookies if I made them!

I grew up on the authentic Mediterranean diet. Vegetables and legumes were a big part of my diet. My mother always used to say, “What you eat today, walks and talks tomorrow.” This turned out to be true as I’m sure you know. If you eat that second piece of chocolate cake, you’re going to notice it when you put your pants on tomorrow. Maybe Michelle Obama should adopt my mother’s phrase. I think the slogan could help curb the obesity problem we have in this country.

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Belated Father’s Day Wishes to All Fathers

22 Jun sxc.hu/paulosimao

My Blog wasn’t ready in time for me to wish all fathers a Happy Father’s Day so I’m saying it now: Happy Father’s Day!

Now that you are a father, it’s even more important that you take care of your health; not just for yourself, but for your family.

My dad was good about eating the right foods (although he loved ice cream and cheesecake.) But otherwise he always ate a salad with dinner and always had an egg (raw, eww) for breakfast.

He got plenty of exercise because it was six long blocks to the Long Island Railroad not to mention nine flights of stairs to apartment 6D.

He lived to be 82 years young. Here is a tribute to my dad that is heartfelt.

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